Self-Help for the Future
gordoncheung:

 
'Shooting Up', stock market newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic on canvas, board and tulipwood. 150 x 100cm / 2013 After Tulipmania, the first economic bubble over 370 years ago during the Dutch Golden era, the tulip flower’s symbolism of being the most high-status flower transformed in Still life Vanitas paintings to also represent the folly of humanity, civilisation and society. The alluring speculation of the Tulip, a transient beauty brought Holland to it’s knees economically where at it’s peak a bulb sold for more than a house, has parallels with our current global financial crisis as a cycle of repeated history. The Chinese vases hint at where the next bubble might be with flowers psychedelically depicted to suggest a delirious alternate reality. The still life is sometimes regarded as a passive genre but was an expression of what was the birth of modern capitalism with Holland’s trading power.

gordoncheung:

 

'Shooting Up', stock market newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic on canvas, board and tulipwood. 150 x 100cm / 2013

After Tulipmania, the first economic bubble over 370 years ago during the Dutch Golden era, the tulip flower’s symbolism of being the most high-status flower transformed in Still life Vanitas paintings to also represent the folly of humanity, civilisation and society. The alluring speculation of the Tulip, a transient beauty brought Holland to it’s knees economically where at it’s peak a bulb sold for more than a house, has parallels with our current global financial crisis as a cycle of repeated history. The Chinese vases hint at where the next bubble might be with flowers psychedelically depicted to suggest a delirious alternate reality. The still life is sometimes regarded as a passive genre but was an expression of what was the birth of modern capitalism with Holland’s trading power.
2 days agoangrywhistlergordoncheung 97 notes
2 days agorobertogrecomagastrom 218 notes
oxane:

port17x8d by stallio
glitch, zoom, repeat

oxane:

port17x8d by stallio

glitch, zoom, repeat

2 days agooxane 353 notes

michiecao:

Archigrams: whimsical and informative prints of modern architecture’s most iconic buildings, now launched on Kickstarter.  Please help me reach my goal by sharing this project! http://kck.st/1n8Qy7D

6 days agogarychoumichiecao 10 notes
whiskyvangoghgo:

The Internet is whole now.

whiskyvangoghgo:

The Internet is whole now.

1 week agowhiskyvangoghgojeffrey-lebowski 117,497 notes
admiralpotato:

Cascading Tiles 4
High quality version: http://imgur.com/gallery/Or0zjls
I’m not perfectly happy with this design because of how some of the tiles overlap as they rotate, but I’ve been too busy to post for a while now, and this was an easy one to make to try and get back into the creativity groove. What do you think?
The original Cascading Tiles GIF can be found here.

admiralpotato:

Cascading Tiles 4

High quality version: http://imgur.com/gallery/Or0zjls

I’m not perfectly happy with this design because of how some of the tiles overlap as they rotate, but I’ve been too busy to post for a while now, and this was an easy one to make to try and get back into the creativity groove. What do you think?

The original Cascading Tiles GIF can be found here.

1 week agoadmiralpotato 51 notes

jedsundwall:

rollthoserocks:

The Economist highlights what I believe is our generation’s greatest challenge: 

Over the past 30 years the digital revolution has displaced many of the mid-skill jobs that underpinned 20th-century middle-class life.

We’re only at the start of this change and as The Economist points out, if the “analysis is halfway correct, the social effects will be huge.”

As I wrote last May, overall I am optimistic about the future but there are going to be significant negatives that come with the advances. It’s important that we address the problems while nurturing the progress.

The Economist puts forward two ways for governments to support their citizens in the years ahead. The first is education. However, the paper points out that a dramatic change in education is needed, from rote-learning to creativity and critical thinking. The second is through some form of minimum income support.

Changing these systems in any developed nation will require incredible political will. At a time when partisanship makes it difficult for government to enact even minor reform and political leaders appear most interested in governing for electability, it’s hard to believe that changes of this nature can be done without a sizable negative event. Let’s hope that’s not the case.

This is indeed our generation’s biggest challenge, but education and minimum income (which is an idea I love) are small potatoes compared to the moral reform this will require.

Many humans’ labor will soon be worth close to nothing. In many instances, it already is. Meanwhile, in the United States, work ethic is strongly linked to moral worthiness. I mean, we use the term work ethic – if you don’t work, you’re good for nothing.

There’s no doubt that we’ll need to invent new things for people to do, but we’ll also likely need to train ourselves to be perfectly ok with people who do nothing. Particularly if we want to implement any kind of minimum income. That’s a far cry from the moral outrage we see directed at “welfare queens” today.

1 week agojedsundwallrollthoserocks 11 notes
etall:

visiting a friend

etall:

visiting a friend

1 week agoetall 3,434 notes
bigblueboo:

earth rhythms

bigblueboo:

earth rhythms

1 week agobigblueboo 102 notes
programmingisterrible:

"we write everything small, thus saving time", or perhaps UNIX’s lowercase traditions go back to the bauhaus.

programmingisterrible:

"we write everything small, thus saving time", or perhaps UNIX’s lowercase traditions go back to the bauhaus.

1 week agoprogrammingisterrible 8 notes
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